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Thanks for visiting Chrome Computing. The website dedicated to Chrome OS the operating system used for the Chromebook and Chromebox. I hope you find the information on this site helpful.

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Linux is leaving beta from Chrome OS 91

Anyone who has used a Chromebook or Chromebox will know that a lot of tasks needs an internet connection. This is one of the advantages of the Chromebook, but it was seen as a huge disadvantage when it launched all those years ago.

Since then we have seen apps you can install locally in the form of Android Apps. These apps allow you to carry out certain tasks on your Chromebook, and you don’t necessarily need an internet connection to use them. Android Apps are great because they offer so much flexibility, but they’ll never offer what a fully-fledged computer program can offer.

Although the need to install computer programs locally is a thing of the past for the majority of tasks. There are still times when installing programs locally is necessary. This is especially true for advanced video, music and image editing. Luckily, this is all possible with Chrome OS thanks to Linux. Linux is one of the most secure and robust operating systems available and it comes in many different guises.

The end of Linux Beta

Although Linux has been available for Chrome OS for some time now. It hasn’t been something that has been used by everyone. This is because it was only until recently that you could access Linux in stable mode. Before then, if you wanted to use Linux Beta you had to leave the stable channel and use the less secure developer channel.

Since Linux Beta was available to everyone in the stable channel we’ve seen a lot more interest in Linux for Chromebook. The good news is that Google has announced Linux will be leaving Beta. This is fantastic news and it’s been something a lot of people have been wanting to see for a while. Don’t get me wrong, Linux Beta for the Chromebook is now pretty robust anyway, but it’s still good to see the beta will be dropped.

Anyone who is comfortable with Linux or is happy to mess about with Linux in Beta mode is unlikely going to think this is major news. However, it’s an important step for anyone who looks at beta and thinks I’m not going anywhere near that just yet. This is totally understandable if you don’t feel too confident with using technology that may not work as intended.

When is it happening

Google has been working hard to get Linux out of Beta mode for some time now. You’ll start seeing Linux come out of Beta when your Chrome OS device updates to Chrome OS 91. This means you should not have to wait for too long before you see the end of the beta label.

At the moment when your Chrome OS device updates it takes about 15 minutes for Linux Beta to update. Once Linux is out of Beta the updates will happen at the same time. I’m sure we will start to see more apps become available in Linux in the future. One that many people may be interested in is Steam. At the moment if you want to play games you have to use Stadia or Nvidia GeForce Now. If the Steam app works and takes advantage of the hardware in your device. It may mean we’ll be able to start playing games locally. Great news for anyone who doesn’t have a decent internet connection.

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